Sounds of Madrid

There are days where my unilateral hearing can make me feel so vulnerable. Going outside can be such a challenge, and one that I have to mentally prepare myself for every day. I live in a city, and as soon as I open the apartment block door, I walk out into a mess of noise. Loud deep roars of traffic and the chatter of people forces me into a bubble of isolation. When I am surrounded by sound I cannot sense when there is something approaching my deaf side. I do not realize when someone is walking next to me, or if a bike or car is about to pass me by. When there are background noises, it is difficult for me to focus on conversation; I can’t hear individual sounds clearly, and my ear and head fill with pressure from the sounds, which also adds to the difficulty in understanding speech. If I am outside by myself, I try to keep my deaf ear to the wall, or next to the traffic, so that my good ear has a better chance at hearing noises of significance. When I’m outside with my boyfriend or friends, I have to keep them on my hearing side, and find myself constantly looking at them, to check if they have said something to me.

Traveling on the metro is uncomfortable. The loudness of the train approaching and the screech as it nears the platform can be almost unbearable. Once on the train, there is a bell sound and an announcement of each stop. This bell can be piercingly loud. Before arriving to a station, a recorded announcement says: “Próxima estación [name], correspondencia con línea [number]”: “Next station [name], transfer with line [number]”. Some metro lines have announcements to mind the gap between the train and the platform. Some trains have a whistle sound when the doors close. The metro is a challenging bombardment of sounds. I worry when I’m traveling alone that people might talk to me, and I won’t be able to hear them, or even worse, not even realize they are speaking to me, if they are on my deaf side. They don’t know I can’t hear them. I always worry about seeming rude if I don’t respond to people.

Madrid is a city that is bursting with the music of performers and entertainers. Every part of the city has its own soundtrack. People hop on and off of metro trains; wheeling their portable amplifiers, and various instruments: panpipes, guitars, violins, even miniature pianos. In metro stations, and in fact anywhere in the city, you might encounter a man playing his violin to the soundtrack of Titanic. You might encounter someone playing drums, made of pots and pans or other recycled materials, to a fast backing track beat. You might encounter another violinist, this time without a backing track, and passionately playing a well-known piece of classical music. You might encounter guitarists strumming guitars wildly and singing with raw passion. When walking into town, you can hear a Spanish guy sitting on the side of the street playing his guitar, singing Bob Marley songs in his own unique style; short high-pitched staccato sounds.

This intrinsic creativity, that is present in every part of Madrid, is enchanting. But it is also something that now presents me with a challenge. Now I am trying to enjoy the sounds of Madrid again. Now I am trying not to focus on the tinnitus that the loud sounds of music can bring, and not to focus on the perpetual worry of missing a strangers words. Instead I want to focus on learning to enjoy this wonderfully noisy city that I live, and that I am trying to love again.

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Author: myhearinglossstory

Hi, My name is Carly. I am 34 years old and I am currently living in Spain. I am originally from a small seaside town in Yorkshire called Bridlington, and have also lived in China and Thailand. I am an Early Years primary school teacher, and have been teaching for nearly 12 years. I love walking in the countryside, getting lost in Madrid, going out for breakfast, taking photos, listening to music, storytelling podcasts, baking, running, drinking wine, and eating spicy food. This year I experienced sudden sensorineural hearing loss in my left ear. I have started this blog as a way to inform my friends and family about my progress, for anyone else who is going through a similar experience as me, or for anybody who is interested in learning about this type of hearing loss, and the way it can affect everyday life.

5 thoughts on “Sounds of Madrid”

  1. If my experience is anything to go by you will be amazed at how well your brain eventually adapts to the new normal. Keep doing exactly what you are doing already, exposing yourself to all the situations you want to feel comfortable in again. Gradually, I’m sure, what you are now describing as the bombardment of noise will lessen. There must be a medical name for this adjustment but I don’t know what it is. I know it’s real though. The shock of the new goes away and things sound normal. Not like you used to hear, but not horrible either. (I could think of a few exceptions, but maybe that just proves the rule……). Hang in there Carly.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for the advice Vera 🙂 I am determined! I will do like you said, and I will keep going into the city and exploring all the places I love. I am hopeful that over time, things will start to get easier, as my ears and brain get used to the new intensity of sounds. Take care. Carly

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